Skip to content

Test

  • 火の葬送曲(続・山原の火):一転向者、赤裸々の軌跡

    火の葬送曲(続・山原の火):一転向者、赤裸々の軌跡
    author: 山城善光
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 2.00
    book published: 1978
    rating: 2
    read at: 2011/03/07
    date added: 2011/03/06
    shelves: japanese-history
    review:
    The author of the book, "Yambaru no hi," decided to detach himself from Socialists and Communists, reset his life, and started working for Japanese diplomats and then for Yokusan kai. There is no big drama behind these changes. He just emphasizes that he wanted to restart his life because he was sorry for his mother and family members who had to suffer because of his previous engagement in the peasant movements. This sequence has less information regarding Okinawa itself. The latter half that talks more about the Okinawan communities in Osaka and Tokyo is more useful for researchers, I guess.

  • 山原の火—昭和初期農民闘争の記録

    山原の火—昭和初期農民闘争の記録
    author: 山城 善光
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.00
    book published: 1976
    rating: 4
    read at: 2011/03/02
    date added: 2011/03/02
    shelves: agrarianism, childhood-and-youth
    review:
    This is a memoir supported by his numerous interviews with the old people who were involved in the movement in the 1930s. This is probably the biggest Socialist/Communist movement in Okinawa, and according to his description, it is as "grass-roots" as any movement could possibly get. The trick is the village youth groups which actively and unitedly joined this village-politics reform movement. There are not many sources left on this movement because of the harsh crackdown by the police as well as the battles of Okinawa — even newspaper articles are gone. His memoir is incredibly detailed, and I really enjoyed catching his nuances that reveal to what extent ideology mattered or did not matter. In the end Communism helped them a lot in building strong morale and "connected-ness" to the rest of the world, but at the same time brought extremely harsh crackdown by the police which led to their eventual defeat. He also emphasizes the "youth" element of the movement (yes!).

  • 秘録 防衛隊

    秘録 防衛隊
    author: 福地昿昭
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1985
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/03/03
    date added: 2011/03/02
    shelves: agrarianism, colonial-studies, soldiers
    review:
    A collection of interviews about the battles in Okinawa. "Boeitai" basically consisted of all male residents under 40 years old in Okinawa who could work. Many of them brought their own shovels and plows — they were the only "weapons" they had. Their stories highlight Okinawans’ perception of the Yamato (non-Okinawan) soldiers and military officers who brought in extreme battlefield psychology without respect for the locals. Many mentionings about Korean comfort women in Okinawa, too.

  • Origins of the Korean War, Volume II: Roaring of the Cataract 1947-1950

    Origins of the Korean War, Volume II: Roaring of the Cataract 1947-1950
    author: Bruce Cumings
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.40
    book published:
    rating: 3
    read at: 2010/02/11
    date added: 2011/02/27
    shelves: korean-history
    review:

  • 沖縄の民衆意識

    沖縄の民衆意識
    author: 大田 昌秀
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 5.00
    book published: 1995
    rating: 5
    read at: 2011/02/03
    date added: 2011/02/26
    shelves: colonial-studies, japanese-history
    review:
    This book is like.. three rich dissertations in one! The author shows what kinds of influential people ran the three major newspapers in Okinawa during Meiji, how they fought each other, oppressed the freedom/popular rights movement, how they imagined the place of Okinawa within the Japanese empire, how they reacted against various "plans" and "rumors" from Yamato (e.g., sending all the lepers and criminals to Okinawa, putting Okinawa under the control of the Government General of Taiwan, etc) and so on and so forth. Most relevant to my research, he shows how the militarization (recruiting and raising soldiers) and assimilation went hand in hand. When I first read other books on the Okinawan history, I thought the authors confused the usage of "kominka 皇民化" with assimilation 同化 without knowing the deeply colonial connotation that it conveys, but it makes total sense that this process is called kominka!!

    Update: Wait. I just realized that the author is THE Ota Masahide, the famous governor of Okinawa in the 1990s who fought the Japanese government. NO WONDER he’s awesome.

  • 金閣寺

    金閣寺
    author: Yukio Mishima
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.92
    book published: 1956
    rating: 5
    read at:
    date added: 2011/02/24
    shelves:
    review:

  • 比嘉春潮全集 第4巻 評伝・自伝編

    比嘉春潮全集 第4巻 評伝・自伝編
    author: 比嘉春潮
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.00
    book published: 1971
    rating: 4
    read at:
    date added: 2011/02/17
    shelves:
    review:

  • Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China (Asia: Local Studies/Global Themes)

    Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China (Asia: Local Studies/Global Themes)
    author: Ruth Rogaski
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.33
    book published: 2004
    rating: 5
    read at: 2011/02/07
    date added: 2011/02/07
    shelves: fun-readings, taiwanese-chinese-history
    review:
    I was tired of reading dictionary-like Japanese history books and felt lost about what I was doing in academia. I needed some inspiration. I’m glad I grabbed this book in the library — Rogaski totally pulled me back to the excitement of doing history. It also gave me a luxury time of reading something unrelated to my work, one chapter at a time, like eating a small piece of chocolate between meals, during the bath time, before the bedtime, and between my sources.

    Her usage of Tianjin as a site is a great model to those of us who do local histories. Her research has geographical width (moving from China to Britain to Japan) and chronological depth (going over the Confucius scholarship and giving references to current China). I learned that readers of the outside field like me actually appreciate the width and depth even if she had to depend a lot on secondary sources.

    Her work is also super entertaining. I most appreciate her willingness to fill the gap between the sources with her own imaginations that give rich pictures of people’s real lives there.

    I also liked how she tightens up her points and implications in the intro and conclusion of each chapter. It’s hard to find model conclusions in history books — I’ll definitely come back to her book to learn how she does it.

  • 大日本青少年団史

    大日本青少年団史
    author: 日本青年館
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 2.00
    book published: 1970
    rating: 2
    read at: 2011/02/08
    date added: 2011/02/07
    shelves: agrarianism, childhood-and-youth, japanese-history, soldiers
    review:
    This is an official history of Seishonendan between 1940 and 1945. Yes. They wrote 930 pages to tell what they did during those 5 years. I first expected that, given it was written in 1970, the narrative would be more apologetic about its involvement in the total mobilization. I was wrong. It quite refreshingly (or more usefully for me) reproduces the wartime rhetoric of its glorious patriotic activities. Unlike many of Japanese histories, there is no attempt to separate youth from the army at all. The authors are the Seishonendan leaders (ministers, gov officials etc) back then, and they interestingly show some prejudice against "ignorant and crass" rural youth as well.

  • 総力戦体制と教育―皇国民「錬成」の理念と実践

    総力戦体制と教育―皇国民「錬成」の理念と実践
    author: 寺崎 昌男
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1987
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/02/06
    date added: 2011/02/06
    shelves: agrarianism, childhood-and-youth, japanese, japanese-history, soldiers
    review:
    This is a neat collection of articles that cover different aspects of "total mobilization" education during WWII in Japan. The whole book evolves around the word "錬成" (training? spiritual/moral training?). I appreciate Shimizu Yoshiyuki’s introduction and conclusion very much in that he argues two types of rensei — one is "道場型" and the other is "生活型," and gives historical and theoretical backgrounds of these two types as well as the debates and practices about them. There are a couple of interesting things for my research(e.g. factory owners complained about the agrarian style rensei, etc) that show the place of agrarianism in the total mobilization.

  • 近代日本の学校と地域社会―村の子どもはどう生きたか

    近代日本の学校と地域社会―村の子どもはどう生きたか
    author: 土方 苑子
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1994
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/02/04
    date added: 2011/02/04
    shelves: agrarianism, childhood-and-youth, japanese-history
    review:
    This is a very nerdy, technical book. She went through the records in a village in Nagano, recounted the students between Meiji and early Showa, made database, and looked at the details of the changes, etc. It is cool that she shows the difference between Monbusho statistics and the actual number etc (although it gets too detailed). Her study was very useful for me who needed to know the place of the elementary school in village affairs and changing rules and trends around it. Unless you have a specific purpose to read it, however, it does not really tell you "how kids lived in villages" as in the title, and is probably a super boring book.

  • Okinawa-ken no kyoikushi =: Okinawa (Todofuken kyoikushi)

    Okinawa-ken no kyoikushi =: Okinawa (Todofuken kyoikushi)
    author: Makoto Asano
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published:
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/02/04
    date added: 2011/02/03
    shelves: childhood-and-youth, colonial-studies
    review:
    Nice, quick read. It started to bother me, however, why all these supposedly "survey" histories end at the end of Meiji??

  • 韓国農村社会研究

    韓国農村社会研究
    author: 崔在錫
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.00
    book published: 1979
    rating: 4
    read at: 2011/01/31
    date added: 2011/01/31
    shelves: agrarianism, colonial-studies, korean-history
    review:
    This is an ethnography of Korean rural societies researched in the 50s-70s. I had been postponing it since it looked very technical, but as the library due date approached, I finally decided to skim it.

    It was an easier read than I expected, and I ended up reading the whole book carefully. Ethnography on rural societies (how people recognize hierarchies in the village, how clans organize themselves, how often extra-marital sex happens etc) fed my earthy, gossipy curiosity. Although I did not know if it would be worth reading it because it is an old study, I am very happy that I did. His interviews reveal some of the photos were staged during the colonial period to appear as if there were communal support networks.

  • 日本植民地下朝鮮における学校体育政策

    日本植民地下朝鮮における学校体育政策
    author: 西尾 達雄
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 2.00
    book published: 2003
    rating: 2
    read at: 2011/01/28
    date added: 2011/01/28
    shelves: childhood-and-youth, colonial-studies, japanese, korean-history
    review:
    I am trying to figure out why this book did not interest me at all. This is a massive book (600+ pages) on the history of physical education policies in colonial Korea. Typical to Japanese academic books, it targets a veeery narrow range of audience. But I bet my research interest (on youth mobilization) is as close as it could possibly get. Maybe because I skimmed it too fast — but I got faster and faster as I found it boring.

    It’s maybe because each section is too short (about 1-2 pages) yet each chapter is too long (50-70 pages) — the narrative fails to grab me. Maybe because the chapters are too strictly chronological, sacrificing interesting overarching arguments. It doesn’t give take-home messages. There are a lot of potentially interesting materials and debates. But the author just lists them up without showing why they are important. It felt more like reading "the news" sections of 文教の朝鮮 journal from the colonial period rather than reading someone’s interpretation given in 2003.

    It’s maybe because I am not very interested in "official policies" any more. There must have been interactions between these policies and people in schools. Following only the policy side is like talking about marriage by only looking at one spouse — it makes me question any judgment made based on the research like this.


  • 竹内利美著作集 (3) ムラと年齢集団

    竹内利美著作集 (3) ムラと年齢集団
    author: 竹内 利美
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1991
    rating: 3
    read at:
    date added: 2011/01/27
    shelves: agrarianism, childhood-and-youth, japanese
    review:
    Very ethnographical, good-old-days anthropological work on traditional village age groups, especially children’s. Just… I need citations for the information he gives.

  • 1Q84, #3

    1Q84, #3
    author: Haruki Murakami
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.63
    book published: 2010
    rating: 3
    read at:
    date added: 2011/01/19
    shelves: fun-readings
    review:
    It’s ok. Nothing special about it. Moderately entertaining. If you read book 1 and 2, you have to read it anyway.

  • みやぎ草の根運動の群像

    みやぎ草の根運動の群像
    author: 米倉辰治郎
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1984
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/01/18
    date added: 2011/01/18
    shelves: agrarianism, japanese
    review:
    It is ok. The author is one of the leaders of the socialist movements who planned a coal mine strike and peasant movements before and after the war. So half of the book is his memoir. Good information about other main figures but the analysis was too simple and black & white.

  • J. S. Mill: 'On Liberty' and Other Writings (Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought)

    J. S. Mill: 'On Liberty' and Other Writings (Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought)
    author: John Stuart Mill
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.92
    book published: 1989
    rating: 4
    read at:
    date added: 2011/01/13
    shelves: theory
    review:

  • イナグヤナナバチ―沖縄女性史を探る

    イナグヤナナバチ―沖縄女性史を探る
    author: 堀場 清子
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 3.00
    book published: 1990
    rating: 3
    read at: 2011/01/12
    date added: 2011/01/12
    shelves: colonial-studies, women
    review:
    The author follows three women’s movements in Okinawa in the modern period. The big chunk was about the movement to end the customs of "washing bones" (It was women’s job to dig up buried corpses to wash remaining rotten flesh out of bones. Quite traumatic and tragic for women) and to set up crematories. She does a lot of oral interviews and simultaneously shows the difficulty of doing women’s unwritten history. The other two were the change in clothing style (from Okinawan to Japanese to Western style) which also involved the class issue, and then the inheritance customs which long remained unconstitutionally male-dominant. There were too many dramatic, personal reflections by the author, but it is an interesting read.

  • 少年団の歴史―戦前のボーイスカウト・学校少年団

    少年団の歴史―戦前のボーイスカウト・学校少年団
    author: 上平 泰博
    name: Sayaka
    average rating: 4.00
    book published: 1996
    rating: 4
    read at: 2011/01/12
    date added: 2011/01/12
    shelves: childhood-and-youth, japanese, japanese-history
    review:
    3.5 stars. This is a useful, critical, professional survey history but lacks a bit of analytical punch. Shonendan in Japan is much closer to the Boy Scouts than Seinendan was — it spread mainly in urban areas among school-age kids. Shonendan had two rivaling networks (teikoku shonen dan and dai nihon shonen dan), both of which were integrated into the same system of dai nihon seishonen dan with seinendan and joshi seinendan in the late 1930s. The book gives a clearer sense of how shonendan-related figures characterized each different group, and what kind of political stake it involved when the government unified all of them. Some parts get a bit too detailed, but overall very useful.